17 Apr 2020

The “New” Haves and Have Nots

It wasn’t too long ago when the term “acclimated” did not mean you were adjusted to high altitude at your favorite rocky mountain ski resort. In the mid-1800’s, it meant you had survived a bout of yellow fever (which had a 50% kill rate) and were now immune.

Those acclimated were the lucky “haves” of the time. They were more employable; they wined and dined with socialites; and they lived without fear and anxiety of what “could” happen. (The Atlantic explains further for those historians in our readership).

Those “have nots” were not employable, as employers did not want to undergo training just to find their employees may easily have become incapacitated. They were not marriage material, as the longevity of their lifespan was entirely at risk.

We are entering a phase in this pandemic where we will likely see a resurgence of this type of worldly dichotomy — the “new” haves and have nots will not be about who has money or who doesn’t. It will be about who is “acclimated” and can roam free and without worry. The economy will grudgingly reopen. Those coffee shops, movie theaters and stadiums will fill with the “haves”, those who have been acclimated and survived the process. Baseball teams may fill their rosters by talent + “acclimation” as the “haves” are unlikely to get sidelined (or worse) due to COVID-19.

For most of us, the “new” have nots, those not yet “acclimated” (i.e. immune), we will have some tough decisions to make. What to do, who to tell that we are not yet acclimated, where to go, who we socialize with.

For “unacclimated” professionals — the “new” have nots, one decision that seems reasonable from a risk/reward perspective is the decision to continue to work from home. And there are many of us still unacclimated, which sounds more elegant than being a “have not”.

Millions of today’s work-from-home “unacclimated” professionals had better continue to gear up with the tools to make being a “have not” as comfortable and economically productive as possible.

The Florida Bar recently presented to members a webinar on the best work-from-home Tools for Lawyers (watch recording here). In addition to legal professionals, Tech Essentials recommends these tools and tips for any professional in the insurance, real estate, investment, financial, human resources, etc. fields.

One of the tools featured in the webinar is the E-Sign & E-Security (Free) Work-from-Home Readiness Program, and more and more people and organizations are opting for this award-winning all-in-one tool set that runs inside Outlook or Gmail with just a few clicks. No credit cards or telephone calls are required to get started (click here to access now or learn more).

Let’s show those “haves” that we “have nots” can be just as — or more — productive in today’s strange economic reality.